Wellness

Peanuts are a protein-packed, nutritious, plant-based food with a positive impact on health.

Plant-Based Diets and Health

Peanuts are an affordable, plant-based protein.

Plant-based diets promote better health and cause less environmental impact than diets
rich in animal-based foods. (Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Committee)

2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
Spoon-transparent square
Chicken Breast (1 ss)

$0.15

1 serving = 1 ounce
= 2 tablespoons
= 32 grams

8g

of Protein

$0.21

1/3 Serving = 1 ounce
= 28 grams

8g

of Protein

Health Benefits

Research studies from Harvard and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition confirm that peanuts have a positive impact on disease prevention and health maintenance.

OVERALL:

Eating peanuts has been associated with reduced risk of several chronic diseases in multiple research studies.

 

HEART DISEASE:

Frequent peanut consumption could reduce the risk of death from heart disease by 29 percent. Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, including peanuts, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Frequent peanut consumption has been associated with reduced risk of death from heart disease by 29 percent. A recent analysis of 76,000 women and 42,000 men, all who were U.S. health professionals, found those who reported eating peanuts and other nuts at least five times per week were 29 percent less likely to die of heart disease, compared to those who avoided nuts and peanuts over a 30 year time period. The study was conducted by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard School of Public Health. Limitations include the use of food frequency questionnaires that are subject to human error, the narrow study population of health professionals, and the fact that it was not a randomized controlled trial.

 

DIABETES:

The more frequently peanuts and peanut butter are consumed, the more the risk of type 2 diabetes may decrease.

Consumption of peanut butter and nuts, including peanuts, have been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. Harvard researchers conducted a study of over 83,000 women (ages 34 to 59) from 11 states were followed for 16 years, during which they recorded their dietary intake five times throughout the period. Results showed peanut butter and nut (including peanuts) consumption (5 servings of peanut butter or 5 ounces of peanuts per week) was inversely associated with development of type 2 diabetes. Limitation include data on women only, who were also nurses, and the use of food-frequency questionnaires, which are subject to human error.

LONGEVITY:

People who eat peanuts five or more times per week may decrease their risk of death from all causes by 20 percent.

Eating peanuts five or more times per week has been associated with decreased risk of death from all causes by 20 percent. A recent study of 76,000 women and 42,000 men, all who were health professionals, showed an inverse association between peanut and nut consumption and all-cause mortality. After 30 years of follow-up, about 16,000 deaths of women were reported; after 24 years of follow-up, about 11,000 deaths of men were reported. As compared with participants who did not eat nuts, those who consumed nuts seven or more times per week had a 20 percent lower death rate. The study was conducted by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard School of Public Health. Limitations include the use of food-frequency questionnaires, which are subject to human error, the narrow study population of health professionals and the fact that it was not a randomized controlled trial.

 

OBESITY:

Frequent peanut and peanut butter consumers have lower BMIs and body weight even if they consume more calories.

Peanut and peanut butter consumption has been linked to improved weight maintenance and loss. Peanuts have fat, protein and fiber, which all help people feel full longer. A Harvard-supervised study found that participants (101 overweight men and women) on a calorie-controlled, moderate-fat diet had greater and more sustained weight loss than people on a calorie-controlled, low-fat diet. Participants in the moderate-fat diet were also more likely to remain compliant at 18 months. The results suggested that a moderate-fat diet, which included peanuts and peanut butter, resulted in weight loss without the participants reporting feelings of hunger. Limitations included its relatively small sample size and the lack of success in obtaining follow-up measurements of all dropouts.

Peanuts are a good source of fiber, good fats and contain more than 30 essential vitamins and minerals.

One serving of peanuts is a good source of…

Folate
41.1 mcg – (10% Daily value)
Helps produce red blood cells and is essential during pregnancy.
Vitamin E
30 IU – (16% Daily value)
An antioxidant that helps support the immune system.
Magnesium
50 mg – (13% Daily value)
Important for heartbeat regularity, as well as healthy muscles and nerves.
Copper
0.2 mg – (9% Daily value)
Essential for red blood cell formation, nerves, immune system and bones.
Phosphorus
100 mg – (10% Daily value)
Important for bone health, hormones and energy production.
Niacin
3.8 mg – (20% Daily value)
Helps convert food to energy and supports digestive, nervous system and skin health.

Helping Malnourished Children Around the World

Project Peanut Butter was founded by Mark Manary, M.D., a pediatrician and specialist in fighting malnutrition.

In 1985, Dr. Manary and his wife, Mardi Manary, moved to Africa to work in a rural hospital in Tanzania. Dr. Manary realized that the available emergency foods were insufficient for countering the extent of malnutrition he encountered. He and colleague Dr. André Briend developed a new peanut-based ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), which is shelf-stable and more easily distributed than previous RUTF formulations.

Recovery rates with the new peanut-based RUTF are dramatically higher than the older liquid formula, rising from 25–50% to 75–95%. Learn more about Project Peanut Butter here.